BeddowTree

The Genealogy of the Beddow Family (and others)

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101 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From a history of North and West Texas about 1907.

Thomas Flinn Sweazea, The gentleman whose life achievements and whose family genealogy are treated in the following article is one of the substantial citizens and successful farmers of Clay County. On his advent hither in 1878 he pre-empted a tract of land five and a half miles northwest of Bellevue and, with his limited means, began its improvement and cultivation. His industry and his thrift worked marked changes in it during the twelve years he occupied it and when he deserted it to take possession of his present home it had the appearance of a Clay county farm.
In 1888 Mr. Sweazea bought three hundred and sixty-four acres of land two miles northwest of Bellevue, which has been transformed, under his magic touch, into one of the most attractive and valuable farmsteads near Bellevue. Good land was only worth four dollars an acre when he purchased his, and this tract, together with the one he entered from the state, gives him a holding of more than six hundred acres in the county.
Thomas F. Sweazea was born in Shelby county, Texas, June 13, 1848. His father, Mattias Sweazea, was a Wayne county, Missouri, settler and located in Shelby county about 1846. The latter's birth occurred in Missouri about 1820 and his death in Shelby county, Texas, in 1865. He left brothers in Wayne county, Missouri, and had a brother, Jeff, who passed his life in California. Mattias Sweazea was a Confederate soldier, having served intermittently under several enlistments, and died in the prime of life at the close of the war. He married Hannah L. McFadden in Wayne county, Missouri, who, at the age of eighty-one, is active and is in the enjoyment of life among her several children. She was married to Mr. McFadden prior to her union with Matthias Sweazea and had the following issue: Nancy J., who died in West Texas, as Mrs. Fernando Wheeler, leaving children: Artemissa, who passed away in Robertson county, as Mrs. Joe Bolton, also leaving children: Mary Ann, Mrs. Charles Bolton, who died in Robertson county, was the youngest child and she also left heirs. Thomas F. was the first Sweazea, and the others were: James F., of Castro county, Texas; Elizabeth, wife of Nathaniel Wilson, of Indian Territory; Amanda J., who resides in Greer county, Oklahoma, as the wife of James Watson: Matthias, who died in Oklahoma, leaving a family, and Laura, wife of Rankin Clark of Portales, New Mexico.
The school advantages of Thomas F. Sweazea were poor. He grew up during and just after the war when conditions were very unstable and when facilities for educating the young were very meager. The log schoolhouse with slab benches was the natural habitation of the children of the war period and the teacher's occupation was, oftentimes, that of keeping school instead of teaching it.
Mr. Sweazea became acquainted with work very young in life. He began life at "cropping" about the first years of the '60s, and his efforts had won him an eighty-acre farm before he left Shelby county. He pocketed the proceeds of its sale in 1873, when he started west, and had spent the most of it in search of the "right place" before he concluded his four years of wandering. After he finally settled down "he made up for lost time" and is today in a financially healthy condition. Grain, feed and cattle-raising has he devoted himself to and with what success the county tax rolls will positively reveal.
In Nacogdoches county, Texas, Mr. Sweazea married, in December, 1865, Candace A. Bryant, a daughter of Mrs. Clarissa A. Bryant, Texas settlers from Georgia Mrs. Sweazea was born in Georgia in July, 1848, and is the mother of Thomas Matthias, Modeline, a Wise county teacher who died at twenty years of age: Jeff, who married Ida Mills, has children, Loma and Edith, and farms the old family homestead; Elbert, Stella, wife of Walter Mills, of Castro county, Texas, with one child, Jay, and Odie and Bertie.
Although nearing his sixtieth year, Mr. Sweazea appears in robust health and it is evident that his years of unremitting toil have not imperiled his constitution. His efforts here have redounded to the substantial development of Clay county and he deserves credit for his success.

Sweazea family History by J. E. Sweazea [1968]

Thomas had begun his farming at an early age, had proved up on 80 acres of land. By the time the family determined that they should leave Shelby County, Thomas was married, and had sold his 80 acre tract. There were three families in the move, Thomas and his family, James headed up a wagon [it is not known whether James was married at this time] and Elizabeth and her husband, Nathaniel Wilson, headed up another wagon [Hannah moved with Elizabeth] and possibly there was a fourth, Mary Ann [Bolton], first born Sweazea by Matthias and Hannah [1845].
Their move led them, first into the hill country of Texas, later into Tarrant County, Wise County, some went into Oklahoma, Mary Ann and her husband, Charles Bolton, eventually wound up in Robertson County, Texas, and the end of the trail, after four years, for Thomas and James, was Clay County. They forded rivers, braved the weather, suffered the storms, the cold and the heat, each in search of their "utopia". They stopped and stayed in one place for only a short time, slept with guns, at reach, with someone on guard at all times, in fear that the Sapp clan might locate them.
Thomas and James "drove up stakes" in Clay County, the date and time cannot be accurately determined, but by the time they reached Clay County, Thomas and his wife Candace, had one son, Thomas M., and had lost one baby girl, Amanda, in 1870, another girl was born, Sept. 17, 1873 [Delia]. It is not known whether Delia was born before or after they reached their new home. It is known that their new home was a "dug out" [cellar], and their son Jeff, was born, May 5, 1878, in this cellar, and spent the first few years of his life there. It is known, to this date, the exact location of the cellar [ by some or at least one of the descendants of Thomas F. Sweazea ]. By the time Thomas, et al, reached Clay County, he had used up most of the money he had received when he sold his 80 acre tract in Shelby County, but with his limited means, he began cultivation and improvements. His industry and thrift brought about marked changes in the property, and he so occupied this land for 12 years before acquiring other property, retaining the original property until the early 1920's, when he sold it to his son Elbert [Ebb].
In 1888, records show that Thomas acquired 364 acres of land, about 3 miles northwest of Bellevue, Clay Co., Texas, increasing his land holdings, at that time, to more than 600 acres. It was on this newly acquired land that he spent the remainder of his life, and died at the age of 79, about 15 days before his 80th birthday. (June 15, 1848 - May 29, 1928).
Thomas Flinn Sweazea was one to be reckoned with. Seeing his father shot in the back at the age of 15, married at the age of 17, proving up on 80 acres of land by the time he was 18-19, avenging the death of his father at about the age of 18, wandering about for 4 years, until about the age of 25, recovering from the expenditure of what little money he had left when he reached Clay County, recovering from the theft of every horse he owned, by the Indians, and sometimes, theft by "white" horse rustlers, withstanding sickness, death and providing for a large family.
There were times when Thomas and his wife (Candace) would hear the Indians "stealing" his livestock during the night, and being the wise man that he was, would not make a sound to alert the Indians that he was aware of what was going on. His philosophy was, " I can get more horses, or maybe get these back, but if the Indians are a mind to, they might kill my entire family, and I can't get my life (or that of my family) back."
Fencing, or no fencing. was a problem during his early days in Clay County. There were no fences, and realizing that he had to protect his crops, his livestock and his boundary (from open grazing), Thomas and a man by the name of Gaines, traveled with team and wagon, from Bellevue to Gainesville, bought barbed wire, hauled it back to Bellevue, and with same, built the first barbed wire fence west of Fort Worth. Needless to say, his popularity waned for a time, but it soon became evident to others that barbed wire fences had to come, with the opening of the west.
Another problem Thomas faced, was, his farm (#1) was nestled in among large ranches. One, in particular, joined his land on the east, and was owned by a family by the name of Carr. This Mr. Carr had an old boar hog that was rather roguish, and would come to his corn crib and root his way into access to his corn. Thomas was a good farmer, the land was "new" and fertile, and he raised, mostly, small grains and corn. His early cribs were slatted, thus, the boar hog had very little problem gaining entrance, for he could root up or into just about anything he wanted to. Thomas told Mr. Carr to keep his boar Hog from his corn crib, for if he didn't keep him away, he was going to kill him. Mr. Carr didn't keep the boar hog away and Thomas did kill the hog. Mr. Carr was irate, rode his horse to Thomas' house, fully intending to give him a sound beating. Mr. Carr wore top hat and tails all the time, and was quite a sight, horseback. Thomas saw him coming and felt he knew what was up, so he mounted his horse and took chase. Thomas couldn't quite catch up to the point that he could drag Mr. Carr off his horse, but they were going at such speed that the "tails" of his coat were flying aft. Thomas managed to get one of the coat tails into a good grip, thinking he might pull Mr. Carr off his horse by this means. The coat ripped up the seam, out through the neck, and at that point, Thomas wound up with "half a coat", including the sleeve. The half coat hung on one of Thomas' tall - lot fence posts until it rotted and fell, but that was the end of that problem.
Thomas Flinn Sweazea was a man to be reckoned with. Don't shake his tree, step on his toes or blow smoke in his face!
In his earlier days in Clay County, there was no medicine. If illness occurred, either use kerosene or whiskey, and that was it. On one occasion, Thomas had sent for a bottle of whiskey, strictly for medicinal purposes. By this time the railroad had moved through Bellevue, and the whiskey was to arrive by train, and to be picked up at the depot. Someway, somehow, word was sent out to Thomas that his whiskey had arrived, so he and his son Ebb (then 17 years old) rode horseback into Bellevue to get the whiskey. (Thomas never owned an automobile, and up until his death, hadn't ridden in but a few.) Thomas and Ebb went to the depot and got the whiskey, then rode their horses to the back of a general store. In that day and time, every store had a coal bin "out back", and that is where they tied their horses, then laid the whiskey over into the coal bin. For some reason, they needed to go into the store, and weren't in there very long, but as they were leaving, one of the local preachers came in the back door and claimed to have killed a rattle snake "out back". Thomas didn't take that very seriously, until he reached into the coal bin to get his whiskey - it was broken! He still didn't tie the "rattle snake" story and the broken whiskey together, but on the way back to the farm, BINGO, he put the two together. Upon arriving at the horse barn he told Ebb, "Saddle us two fresh horses, we are going back to town."
As they rode their horses back toward town, rather "pertly", Thomas told Ebb that he was going to "whip" that preacher for breaking his whiskey. They arrived back at that same coal bin, tied their horses and entered the back door to find the preacher still lecturing about killing a rattle snake. Ebb's assignment, and part in this, was to keep anyone from interfering with the scuffle. Thomas told Ebb on the way back to town that he didn't intend to "hurt" the preacher badly, only scratch him up and give him a proper lesson about not killing rattle snakes. Thomas kept his finger nails trimmed and cleaned, immaculately, for a farmer/rancher. The preacher held a pipe in his mouth, as he talked, and Thomas approached, hit him one blow with his fist that sent the pipe sailing catapult into space, and at the same time knocking the preacher to the floor. Thomas straddled him and took his neatly trimmed finger nails and scratched his face as if a mountain lion had attacked. This ended that problem, except, the following Sunday morning, the preacher included in his sermon the reason for his facial problem, and from that day forward, he would not take it upon himself to extend his judgement too far into other people's personal life. [J.E. Sweazea] 1968. 
Sweazea, Thomas Flinn (I1144)
 
102 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From a History of OLD WALLA WALLA COUNTY. CANTREL R. FRAZIER

Mr. Frazier was again married in 1907 to Mrs Missouri Ann Wightman, a native of Wayne County, Missouri, and a daughter of Thomas J. and Lucinda Swezea, the former born in Tennessee and the later in Missouri. In 1859 the parents, accompanied by their six children, started across the plains with two hundred head of cattle, which dwindled down to about one hundred head before reaching Walla Walla. Mr Swezea purchased a claim about eight miles from the city on Cottonwood creek. On the eighth of July, 1860, a son, Charles L., was added to the family, he being the first white child born in Walla Walla. Mr Swezea died at the age of seventy-seven years and his wife at the age of seventy-five. Of their nine children only four are now living, namely: Mrs Nancy J. Harer, of Walla Walla; Missouri Ann, now Mrs. Frazier; Smith W., a resident of Harrison, Idaho; and Charles L., of Walla Walla County. Mrs Frazier was a girl of fifteen years when she came to this state and on reaching womanhood married William Wightman, by whom she had one child, Elizabeth, the wife of William Wiseman, of Tacoma. 
Swezea, Missouri Ann (I0798)
 
103 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From a history of the Sweazea Family, by J. E. Sweazea, 1986

James Franklin Sweazea, another to be reckoned with, arrived in Clay County, Texas, in the same wagon train with Thomas, and likewise, drove up a stake and made his claim. James, as did Thomas, started a family, from a "dugout", farmed, raised cattle and horses, good horses, but was not quite the judge of outstanding horses that Thomas was. Thomas and James were close neighbors.
Seven of James Franklin Sweazea's children were born in Clay County, Texas, but about the year 1897, he heard of endless grassy plains in west Texas. There a man could homestead on two sections of land, so James went prospecting, and there he found "what he had been looking for".
In 1898, he loaded his family and all his worldly possesions onto wagons, gathered his livestock [cattle], sold his holdings in Clay County, and moved west to Castro County. He filed on land in the S.E. area of Castro County, established a home, and from all accounts was prosperous.
When the German community of Nazareth was settling up, James got the chance to sell out to German settlers, and at the same time, buy more land, a part of the Lite Knight and Slaton ranch, 10 to 12 miles west of his original place. The new location was center of Castro County- from east to west, and was about 7 miles SE of Dimmitt, the county seat of Castro County.
On the new site, he built a very nice home [for that day and time], and apparrently, continued to prosper. James Franklin Sweazea was shot to death on the courthouse steps at Crosbyton, Texas, May 14, 1923. 
Sweazea, James Franklin (I1145)
 
104 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From a history of the Sweazea Family, by J. E. Sweazea, 1986.

Matthias Sweazea was born in Missouri, 1823. He migrated to Shelby Co., Texas, from Wayne County, Mo., 1846, bringing with him a son ( Alex ), by a previous marriage, and his wife (Hannah McFadden), who had two daughters by a previous marriage. Nancy J. and Artemissa.
The Sweazeas were known for their fine bred Steel Dust Quarter horses. Some of their fine stock was brought to Texas from Missouri. The horses were mostly coal black, some with white stocking feet, some had snip noses and some were bald faced. Some had stars in their face and others cropped out, at times.
When Thomas was 15, and James was 13, they watched their unarmed father (Matthias), being gunned down from behind, by a neighbor named Sapp. There seems to of been some disagreement concerning the school and/or its operation. The killing took place in the front yard of the Sweazea home, while Thomas and James were in the corral, training horses and also unarmed. At the same time, Sapp threatened the boys as to what could and might happen to them. The killing seemed, later, to be all for naught, information passed down through the years, indicated that Matthias was a very sick man, at age 42, and had not much longer to live. At any rate, there was a trial, "mock" though it might have been, at which Sapp claimed "self defense", and was acquitted. Records show that Matthias was killed, 1865.
At some time after the death of Matthias, Alex expressed a wish to return to Missouri to see his mother. Hannah gave him his father's most prized horse for the trek back to Missouri. Alex promised to write, when he reached his destination, but was never heard from. He apparently didn't get very far from home, for some time later, the horse was found and identified by one of the sons [ Thomas or James ]. It was suspected that Alex met with foul play at the hands of the Sapp clan.
Thomas and James, at some later date, laid a plan to avenge their father's death. Some researchers believe it may have been 1868, and some believe it may have been as late as 1873/74. At any rate, the plan worked when Sapp was trapped and shot. Some say that Sapp was executed, but he did not die of this shot, for recent discovery shows that Sapp did not die until 1880, cause of death unknown.
Sapp must have been a very powerful man in the community, with a lot of support from the "clan", for when Thomas and James reported their act to Hannah, she immediately feared for their lives, possibly the entire family. The family loaded their possessions in wagons, gathered their livestock, and in the middle of the night, left their Shelby County home and "headed" west.

continued with Thomas F. Sweazea

Mathias Sweazea served in the Civil War as a Pvt in Co. E, 3rd Reg't Texas Calvary at Camp Wigfall, TX. [Confederate] He was killed after the war by a neighbor, DeKalb Sapp, over a school issue. [from civil war records] 
Sweazea, Mathias (I1110)
 
105 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From Goodspeeds History of Southeast Missouri, 1888 Biographical Index, page 1147.
John G. Swezea a prominent farmer and native of Wayne County, Mo.; was born in 1841. He is a son of James M. and Catherine [ Brown ] Swezea, and grandson of Charles and Elizabeth Swezea. The later couple came from Hickman County, Tenn. to Missouri in 1821, and were among the very earliest settlers of the county. They were the parents of five sons and three daughters. Charles is the only one now living. James M. was born in Tennessee in 1817, being the next to the youngest in the family. He farmed in Wayne County until his death, which occurred in 1861. He was the father of eight children, two of whom are living; John G. and James M. Marquois and Mary died after reaching maturity. The mother died in 1859. In 1861 John G. Swezea joined Col. Green's regiment. Marmadukes brigade, and served until the close of the war, when he came home, purchased a horse, and began farming. He first rented the farm where he now lives for four years, and in 1883 purchased the farm. The total amount of his land is 560 acres, with 350 under cultivation. He was married, in 1862, to Catherine Williams. The Williams family were old settlers of the county, but Mrs Swezea is the only one of the family now living Both Mr and Mrs Swezea are members of the Baptist Church. He has made two trips to Washington Territory, California and Oregon, making the last trip in 1882.

Note; Five sons and three daughters are shown in the 1830 census of Wayne County, Missouri for Charles Swezea. 
Sweazea, John Gilbert (I1224)
 
106 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From the files of the Wayne County Journal Banner, Piedmont, Mo., 1942.
John Henry Kiger was born September 11, 1855, the son of George and Martha [Farley] Kiger, in the state of Illinois. He came to Missouri during the Civil War and was living at Greenville when his Father joined up with the Union Army. His father moved his family to Patterson, Mo. and left them there and went out in the Service and never returned. having been wounded and died in a hospital in Tennessee. The subject of this sketch then moved with his Mother to the farm now owned by Mr. Quinton on Bounds Creek, and lived there till the year 1917. On May 11, 1884, he was married to Martha Elizabeth Ward, daughter of the late Raney Ward. To this union was born nine children, 8 girls and one boy. His wife and two children, Mrs. Anna (Kiger) Talley and Nora preceeded him in death. He leaves to mourn his departure, Mrs. Cora Meador (Patterson) Mrs. Nancy Sweezea (Piedmont) Mrs. Fred Clark (Ellington) George Kiger (Piedmont) Mrs. Dosha Rainwater (Essex) Mrs. Dora Eads (Piedmont) Mrs. Emily Marler (Perryville): 49 Grandchildren, and 30 Great Grandchildren.
At the age of 18 years he joined the New Prospect Baptist Church where he lived till the year 1924, when he moved his membership to Big Lake Baptist Church. He passed to the Great Beyond January 19, 1942 at the Brandon Hospital, Poplar Bluff, Mo., age 86 years 3 months 8 days. Funeral rites conducted Wednesday of the past week. The splendid citizen served as Church Clerk for many years for New Prospect Church and was a Church Deacon. His life was one of service to his fellowman, and in his passing many are grieved. - Contributed. 
Kiger, John Henry (I0994)
 
107 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

From the files of the Wayne County, Journal Banner.------Piedmont, Missouri.
May 27, 1943
Lee Sweazea, 60 years old, a farmer living near Leeper, was drowned in a slough leading into Black river, across from Mill Spring, late last friday. Mr Sweazea was searching for a cow that he had purchased from a farmer across the river and which had gone back home. In company with a neighbor he went after the cow and brought her across the river on the Mill Spring bridge. On this side the cow got away and swam back across the river. Mr Sweazea and the neighbor crossed the river in search of the animal. Mr Sweazea went in one direction and the neighbor in another. When he failed to return, a search was made, but it was not until monday that his body was found.
It was lying on the bottom of the slough in about three feet of water, but the river had gone down considerably and at the time he fell in, was several feet deeper. The searchers had passed the body several times, but it was not where it could be readily seen. Finally, it was found by a boy who fell into the slough and landed on the body. The remains were brought to Piedmont by the Yates Funeral Home and prepared for burial. 
Sweazea, Robert Lee (I1065)
 
108 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

George Sweazea was born on Jennings Creek near Gainsboro, TN. in 1852. His mother died before 1870. He lived with his father until about 1878 when he married his wife, Julia Goad in Clay County, TN. About 1880 they moved to Greenwood Valley, in Carter Co., Mo. There their son Turner Clinton Sweezea was born. George changed the spelling of Sweazea to Sweezea by the time he was married. He moved to Malden, Mo. about 1882. He was farming there when he was killed, in 1889, by a horse he was breaking to the harness. His son Orea Sweezea was born in 1887 at Malden. He is buried at Malden in the Old City Cemetery.

Marriage record of George Sweezea and Julia Goad;

Know all Men by these Presents, That we G. J. Sweezea and J. B. Ray are held and firmly bound unto the state of Tennessee, in the sum of twelve hundred and fifty dollars, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly, and severally, firmly by these presents, to be void on condition that there be no lawful cause why the above bound G. J. Sweezea and Julia Goad should not be joined together as husband and wife in holy wedlock, else remain in full force and virtue.
This 28th day of Nov. 1878.________
G.J. Sweezea (Seal)
J. B. Ray (Seal)


State of Tennessee - - - Clay County
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

To any regular ordained Minister of the Gospel, having the care of souls, or any acting Justice of the Peace for said County, or Judge or Chancellor of said State.
Bond and security having been given in the premises, you are hereby authorized to solemnize the rites of Matrimony between G. J. Sweezea and Julia Goad and join them together in holy wedlock as husband and wife.
Given under my hand at office in Celina, this 28 day of___Nov.____1878.

John J. Brown____Clerk

By virtue of the above license, I have this day solemnized the rites of matrimony between the above named parties.
Given under my hand, this the ____28___day of ____Nov.____1878

J. S. Harlan, JP

 
Sweazea, George J. (I0951)
 
109 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Hannah Swazy was a witness to the will of Peter Whitehair on the 5th day of June 1797. 
Beardsley, Hannah (I0908)
 
110 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Has not been seen or heard from since Delberts funeral in 1927. Archie lived in Los Angeles, California at his death. 
Sweazea, Archie Clyde (I1704)
 
111 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Hazel was School Teacher. 
Merritt, Hazel (I1268)
 
112 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Henry Sweazea was born about 1822, in Jackson County, Tennessee and was a farmer. He married Lydia about 1846. He raised a large Family. He died before 1880 in Jackson County. But little is known about his life. He was a farmer. 
Sweazea, Henry (I0971)
 
113 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Her name was Mary in the 1850 and 1860 Census and Missouri in the 1870 and 1880 census, after she married John Hoskins. 
Sweazea, Mary (Missouri) (I1355)
 
114 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

In 1969 I visited with Thomas Earl Swezea of Spokane, Washington . He was the grandson of Smith Swezea and was raised by his grandfather Smith Swezea.
Tom told me that his grandfather had told him a lot of stories about the trip by wagon train from Missouri to Walla Walla, when he was seven years old and he rode his pony most of the way. He said it took them about six months to complete the journey. 
Swezea, Smith Williams (I0778)
 
115 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

In the 1880 Census of Wayne County, Missouri, Charles Sweazea stated that his Father was born in North Carolina.

Land records, Wayne County, Missouri. MISSOURI LAND PATENTS

SWEAZEA, CHARLES 11/15/1854 120 acres < 35-28-3 > Location
SWEZEA, CHARLES 10/1/1856 160 acres 36-28-3
SWEAZEA, CHARLES 01/01/1859 80 acres 35-28-3

 
Sweazea, Charles (I1221)
 
116 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Ira was 7 years old, Ernest was 4 years old at the time their mother died. Apparently there was communication between the families, for the two sons were brought to Texas, Ira lived with Thomas Flinn, and Ernest lived with James Franklin. This arrangement lasted until Ira was, about 14 years old, when he became restless, "stole" one of his uncle's horses, rode it west as far as about Vernon or Childress, left the horse there and sent word back to Thomas as to where his horse could be found. He found his way further west to his Uncle Jim's ranch, then took his brother with him, back to Oklahoma, to claim the property that was left by his mother, and was rightfully theirs.
Ernest was killed, 1910, in some problem with a town constable, somewhere in Oklahoma. Aulsy Ernest Sweazea's body was brought to Bellevue, Texas, for burial, and his headstone rests in the cemetery lot of Thomas F. Sweazea, Bellevue Cemetery, Bellevue, Texas.
By this time, some "oil activity" had begun on the property that was left to Ira and Ernest, and Ernest's death probably caused Ira to sell the property and return to Texas.
There he met and married Sarah Emily Guyer, April 17, 1912. Into this union was born nine children.
Ira pioneered in New Mexico, owning, operating, and improving a very fine livestock operation, in the vicinity of Quemado. Very near the ranch is where older maps show a village, Sweazeaville. Sweazeaville is eight miles east of Quemado, New Mexico It was on hiway 60 until the hiway was moved north, changing all activity. Sweazeaville was sold to a man by the name of Hinds. A family was living there in the house and refused to move when he asked them to. So he burned them out. All that remains of Sweazeaville is a concrete foundation. The Federal Goverment got the fellow for burning down a U. S. Post Office. Omega, New Mexico had nothing to do with Sweazeaville. [Myrtle Sweazea Cox, 1998] Ira Sweazea died in Colorado Springs, CO., was brought back to the ranch via train to Holbrook, Arizona. Ira is buried on the home ranch.
The log House that Ira built in 1919 is still standing on the ranch, and is still in good living condition. [1998].
The ranch is now owned and operated by Myrtle Sweazea Cox, daughter of Ira Sweazea. At this time, [1998], Myrtle is eighty two and still going great. I visited with her in the winter of 1998. Myrtle said that when she was a young girl that they would have to drive their cattle to Magdalena, New Mexico to the railhead to ship them. which was a distance of over 100 miles. I thought that would be fun. But Myrtle said, no it was not fun. Trying to keep the cows from spooking was not an easy job. It took several days to make the drive. 
Sweazea, Ira (I1249)
 
117 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

It seems that Thomas Jefferson Swezea went by the mame of "Jeff" when he lived in Missouri and that he went by " T.J." after he moved to Washington Terrirory.

From an old Walla Walla County, History Book abt. 1920

THOMAS J. SWEZEA, deceased, a pioneer of 1859, was born in Tennessee in
1809. He spent his early youth there, then came to southeastern Missouri, where he lived until, in 1859, he started across the plains to the west. He made the journey in the usual way for those days, bringing quite a herd of cattle with him. Locating in the city of Walla Walla, he spent two years there, after which he moved to the Oregon line, eight miles southeast of the city, purchased land and engaged in farming. He was there for a number of years, running his five-hundred-acre farm, and raising grain and cattle, but he at length retired to Walla Walla, where he passed the remainder of his days. He died in that city in 1887. While in Missouri he married Miss Lucinda Swezea, and to them were born nine children, five of whom are still living.
Charles L. Swezea, one of his sons, now a farmer eight miles southeast of Walla Walla, has the distinction of being the first white male child born in Walla Walla, the date of his advent into this life being July 6, 1860. He passed his early years in the public schools of the county and on his farther's farm, but on attaining his majority started in life for himself. For a while he rented land of his father, but as soon as circumstances would permit he purchased a place of his own, and to his original holdings he has kept adding until he now has three hundred and twenty acres in all. He is engaged in raising wheat and barley principally, though he also gives some attention to the other farm products. He is one of the progressive and thrifty farmers of the neighborhood, and is well thought of as a man and citizen. Fraternally he is identified with the A.O.U.W. In this county, in 1883, he married Miss Margaret A. Davis, and they became parents of four children, Bessie A., Flinn A., deceased, Grace A., and one daughter who died in infancy.

Thomas J. Swezea owned three slaves in 1840 in Wayne County, Missouri. 
Swezea, Thomas Jefferson (I0780)
 
118 [18212.ged]

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Jackson County, Court Records, July 15 1859.

Quarles, Gardenhire & others vs George Sweazea & others. Two defendants are George and Elizabeth Woolf.

This is the only record we have of George Sweazea. 
Sweazea, George (I1179)
 
119 [18212.ged]

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James B. Ray was the Bondsman for George Sweezea and Julia Goad in 1878, when they were married at Celina, Tennessee 
Ray, James B. (I1163)
 
120 [18212.ged]

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James M. Sweazea resided in Wayne County in 1855. He purchased land in Ripley County, 27 Sept. 1855, Section one, Township 27, Range 3, East., Information taken from Court House Records at Doniphan, Missouri. Original Land Plat Book, 1832- 1858.

James Sweazea owned eight slaves in 1840 in Wayne County, Missouri. 
Sweazea, James Martin (I1220)
 
121 [18212.ged]

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Jane Swezea Married Abram Bridges 27 Nov. 1869. 
Sweazea, Jane (I2500)
 
122 [18212.ged]

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John Swasey came from England when he was about ten years old. He came with his father, John Swasy and his brother Joseph Swasy. They settled at Salem Mass., but they were not happy with the Purtians, so John Sr and John Jr moved to Long Island about 1640. Joseph stayed at Salem and took the Puritan oath. For some of his descendants see Genealogy of the Swasey Family, by B. F. Swasey 1910. Southold Town Records reveal that John Swasey was a very well off man for those days. He owned quite a lot of land and at one time owned Plum Island. He and others sold Plum Island to John Youngs.

Early Long Island Wills: Will of John Swasy [1692]

In ye name of God Amen, I John Swazey of Southhold on Long Island in ye County of Suffolk of ye Province of N. York being of good and sound memory and calling to mind ye uncertainty of this life and that I must yield to death when it shall please God, do make constitute and ordain this my last Will and Testamen' hereby revoking and annulling any other or former will by me made either by word or writing.
Impmis - I give my soul unto God who gave it and my body being dead to be buried and my worldly estate (my just debts being paid) - first - I give & bestow in matter and form following-------------
Item---I give & bequeath unto my son, John Swazey, my dwelling house orchard together with ye buildings , fences and other ye improvements on my home stall and all ye land by me improved southward of ye land which my said son, John, hath fenced in containing he whole breadth of ye land as far as ye Southbay & half ye other lot Westward of it being a second lot with half ye share of Meadow commonly called Horton's Meadow & half another share of Meadow at a place called ye great Meadow and also all my implemts of husbandry & other tools---
Item--I give & bequeath to my son, Joseph Swazey, one hundred acres of land upon which he is settled, lying Westward of my son John's land & northward of my son Joseph's home lot & half ye share of ye great meadow whereof I gave my son John ye is settled, lying Westward of my son John's land & northward of my son Joseph's home lot & half ye share of ye great meadow whereof I gave my son John ye other half and two lots of meadow lying on you other side of ye river which was formerly John Youngs and also ye other half of ye lot Westward of it (whereof ye other half I have given to my son John) & my horses in ye woods to be equally divided between my three sons--
Item -I give & bequeath to my son, Samuel Swazey, ye land now in ye occupation of my son John lying between my son Joseph's & the home stall which by these presents I have given to my son John & ye other half of ye share of meadow called Horton's Meadow with this condition or limitation that my said son Samuel shall not have power to sell alien or dispose of any part or parcel of ye said land hereby granted to him so that if he shall decease without issue ye right of inheritance of ye said land shall be to ye next proper heir also I give to him half my cattle & ye bed & furniture which he lyeth on---
Item--I give to my Daughter, Mehetabell Aldridge, & to ye heirs of Peter Aldridge, deceased, one hundred acres of land lying on ye north side of ye land given to my son Joseph if there be so much land there be it more or less--
Item--I give to my two younger daughters, Sarah and Mary Swazy, ye other half of my cattle to be equally divided (between) them.
Item--I give & bequeath to my four daughters namely, Abigail, Mehatabell, Sarah and Mary all my household goods to be equally divided between them. Item--My will is that in consideration of ye land given to my sons John & Joseph they shall pay to my two younger daughters Sarah & Mary ye sum of twenty pounds current pay of ye County that is to say ten pounds a piece to each of my younger daughters within two years after my decease--
Item--My Will is that Besse my servant shall be free & set at liberty at my decease & she shall have the bed she lyeth on--
Lastly--I do hereby nominate & appoint John Tuthill of Southhold and John Hallet to be the Executors of this my Will & Testament.
In Witness hereof I do hereunto set my hand & seal ye 20th of May 1692.

John Swazy (Seal)
Witnessed by us
Tho Helme
Joseph Tooker

By ye tenor of these presents Know ye that on ye 12th day of Nov. 1692 at Brookhaven in ye County of Suffolk in ye Province of New York before Coll. William Smith Judge of ye Prerogative Court in ye County afores was proved and approved ye last Will & Testament of John Swazey, deceased at Southhold in ye County afores on ye 10th day of June 1692, who by his Will & Testament did nominate & appoint John Tuthill Senr. & John Hallocke his Executors as by ye Will may appear You shall a true full & faithful Inventory of all & singular ye goods chattels & credits that did anywise belong or of right appertain to ye deceased at ye time of his death bring in & deliver to me or to such other Judge or Judges as shall be appointed for this County at or before ye 12th day of May next ensuing & then & there render a true, plain and perfect acct. of your having Executed & performed your duty herein according to ye tenor of ye said Will & ye laws of this Province--Sworn before me the day & year aforesaid---Witness my hand & seal---

William Smith
Tho. Helme Cler.

(54)John Swazey was one of the original settlers in Brookhaven, and one of the six who obtained the first Indian deed. He refused to take the oath of fidelity to the Colony of New Haven in 1659. In 1666 he with others sold Plum Island to John Youngs. He removed to Southold about 1670. His descendants have changed the name to Sweezey. 
Swasey, John (I0909)
 
123 [18212.ged]

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John and Matt were Twins. 
Brasel, John (I2322)
 
124 [18212.ged]

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John Swasey was an Englishman. He wrote and spoke the English language. He was probably born in Bridport, Dorsetshire, England before 1600. He came to America Abt 1629/30 with his two sons, Joseph and John Jr. They settled at Salem, Mass unti l about 1640, when John and John Jr, moved to Long Island. They were among the first settlers at Southold. { Taken from the book } Genealogy of the Swasey Family, by Benjamin Franklin Swasey - 1910 - and Southold Town Records. Most of his descendants that still live on Long Island spell the name, Swezey. It appears that this spelling started about the same time as Sweezy and Sweesy. There are different opinions about when John Swasey died. 
Swasey, John (I0911)
 
125 [18212.ged]

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John Sweazea was probably the son of Richard Sweazea.

He can't be the son of John Sweazea of Jackson County Tennessee, because John came to Jackson County before 1803.

If he was the son of Mathias, then he would of been born in North Carolina or Tennessee.

It is possible that he could be the second son of William Sweazea if he was born in 1810. But not likely. William's oldest son was Thomas Jefferson Swezea born Dec 6, 1809. This is according to family records of Thomas Jefferson Swezea Family of Walla Walla, Washington.


 
Sweazea, John (I1001)
 
126 [18212.ged]

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Johnson A Sweazea married Jane Bridges 30th Oct., 1853. 
Sweazea, Johnston (I2497)
 
127 [18212.ged]

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Johnson Sweazea was a Barber at Van Buren, Missouri. He was divorced. He had a daughter Cleo who married a Fry and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. 
Sweazea, Johnson (I2091)
 
128 [18212.ged]

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Joseph stayed at Salem and the name Swasey was carried on from him. 
Swasey, Joseph (I2079)
 
129 [18212.ged]

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Julia Goad Sweezea was a very classy Lady. She had a saddle horse which she rode with a side saddle. She wore long dresses as was the way for those days and she always dressed very well. She also had a horse and buggy which she drove to town on occasion. When George, her husband was killed in 1889 at Malden Mo., and left her with two small sons, she later married, William Lunyou, and raised another family. She died at Flint, Mi. in 1942 at the home of her son, Orea Sweezea.
Information by Ira Sweezea, grandson of Julia. 
Goad, Julia Isabell (I0952)
 
130 [18212.ged]

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Land Patent Record; Lawrence County, Arkansas

SWEAZEA, RICHARD 07/10/1844 80 acres 27-20-1

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Northeast Arkansas

RANDOLPH COUNTY

Published 1889 by Goodspeed Publishing Company

Richard Sweeza. In giving a history of Randolph County, Ark., the name of Mr. Sweeza deserves honorable mention, for he has always been industrious and enterprising, and has ever aided enterprises which tend to the interests of the county. He was born near where he now lives, on the 1st of February, 1837, and is one of two surviving members (the other survivor being Nancy Jane, the wife of Joseph Thomas, a farmer of the county) of a family of nine children born to Richard and Matilda (Bigger) Sweeza, both of whom were born in Missouri, former's birth occurring in Carter County. They were reared to maturity and married in that State, and after the celebration of their nuptials they resided in Carter County several years, then came to Randolph County, Ark., being among the very first settlers of the county. The country was full of Indians and wild animals at that time, but Mr. Sweeza began to clear a farm, and followed this occupation in connection with blacksmithing throughout life, accumulating thereby a large amount of property. He died in 1841, when a comparatively young man, his widow afterward becoming the worthy companion of Randolph Cook, of Illinois, and her death occurred in that State, in 1855. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sweeza were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he was of French descent. Richard Sweeza, the immediate subject of this sketch, received his early education at home, and made his home with his stepfather. Mr. Cook, until the opening of the Rebellion, when he enlisted in Company C, of the Eighth Arkansas Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was on active duty east of the Mississippi River until the close of the war. He was in twenty-three regular engagements, among which were the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Perryville, [p.435] Atlanta, Nashville, Missionary Ridge and many others. He was wounded by a musket ball in the upper lip, at Atlanta, and also at Ringgold Gap by a shell striking the lock of his gun and bursting. At Atlanta he was taken prisoner, but was re-taken by his friends ten minutes later, and in this engagement his whole command was captured with the exception of twenty men. He saw some very hard service, and after the war he returned home with the consciousness of having been a brave and faithful soldier. Like his father before him he has always been engaged in farming and blacksmithing; and although he commenced life fo r himself with little or no means, he has succeeded well, and now owns 200 acres of excellent land. In 1867 he was united in marriage to Mrs. Louisa Jane (Russell) Bigger, a daughter of Col. James G. Russell, and the widow of Ransom Bigger, who was killed during the war. She died in 1870, an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and three years later Mr. Sweeza wedded Mrs. Sarah A., the widow of M arion Russell. She was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., December 14, 1834, and both are now members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he being a steward in the same. He is a Democrat politically, and is one of the enterprising men of the county. 
Sweazea, Richard (I2483)
 
131 [18212.ged]

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Land Patent Records
Randolph County, Arkansas
SWEAZEA, RICHARD 11/01/1834 40 acres 34-20 1 Location, section,
SWEAZEA, RICHARD 08/16/1838 40 acres 27-20-1 township & range

Probate Record;
Lawerence County, Arkansas;
57.   GLENN,  William  E.,  deceased.  Bond  of  Johnston SWEAZEA, administrator, July 21, 1834. Securities:  Richard SWEAZEA, Lydia GLENN, Aldred GORDON. Heirs: Eight children,  all  of  Arkansas  Territory--Polly  HOBBS, Betsy HUBBLE, Rachel KING, Sally GORDON, Patsy KING, William GLENN, Thomas GLENN, Robert GLENN."

Richard and Matilda had nine children. 
Sweazea, Richard (I1092)
 
132 [18212.ged]

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Land Record from Jackson County, Tennessee
This record gives us an idea just where their land was located in Jackson County, and the neighbors that they had. (Thanks to Moldon Tayse for this Paper)

Whereas, by descent from Jacob Jenkins we, Jessee Jenkins, George Jenkins, John Jenkins Stephen Jenkins, Nancy Sloan, Johnathan Sloan, Rebecca White, Margaret Cowin, Andrew Cowin, Elizabeth Richardson, Benjamin Richardson, Jane Robinson, Alexander Robinson, Ester Sweazea, Mathias Sweazea, Joel Richardson, Harvey Richardson, Mary Ann Richardson, Calib Richardson, Allin Richardson, Martha Jane Richardson, John Richardson, Thomas Richardson, have title to and now hold undivided intrust in certain deeds of lands lying in the state of Tennessee Jackson County, District No. 2 & 3 and bounded as follows, Begining on Edward Dycus line where it crosses a Spring branch. Then with meanders of said branch to it's head. Thence east to Harvey's east boundary line. Thense south with said line to James Jones conditional line between said Jones and Jacob Jenkins. Thence with said line to Henry Jones conditional corner between said Henry Jones and Jacob Jenkins. Thence south with a conditional line until it strikes Jacob Jenkins south east boundary line of his original tract. Thence west with said line until it strikes Reuben Graves line. Thense north to the corner of said original tract between Logan H. McCarver and said Jenkins. Thence east with the line of said original tract to where it crosses John Jenkin's spring branch. Thence up said branch to Harvey's old line. Thence north with said line to a conditional line between Cornelius Carver and Jacob Jenkins. Thence with said line nearly a north east course to a conditional corner. Thense north to an elm. Across of the top of the ridge. Thence with a line to Vincent Mooreland's line to a hack berry. Thence north to two sugar trees on the bank of the branch. Thence down the branch two chains. Thence north to the begining. Also one other tract lying between the main Wartrace creek on the east side of said creek adjoining the lands of John King and others supposed to contain about ninety five acres. Now we having made partition of said land between ourselves have allotted John Jenkins & Stephen Jenkins and convey all our rights, title, intrust in and to the following described tract to them the said John and Stephen Jenkins, jointly and severally and the undivided half of two acres known as the mill tract. Begining on a stone in Jenkin's field on the north side of wartrace creek running thence south 50 degrees west cross the creek at about 10 poles in all 20 poles to a rock. Thence north 51 degrees west 16 poles to a rock. Thence north 50 degrees east across said creek 20 poles to a rock. Thence south 31 degrees east 16 poles to the begining including the Saw & Grist Mill and we further convey to the said John & Stephen Jenkins one other lot or parcel of said land bounded as follows, begining at a stake in Jenkin's old line. Thence east to Henry Jones line. Thence with said line to Richardson's line. Thence to and with Cowin's line to Robinson's line. Thence with 0 degrees line. Thence west to Jenkins north boundary line at the head of a hot spring branch. Thence down said branch to Ramsy's line. Thence with a line to Sweazy's line. Thence with said line to John Ray's line. Thence to a hackberry corner. Thence east to a elm on top of the ridge. Thence south to a pin oak and ironwood. Thence east to a beech and Elm. Thence south to the begining and we the said Jessee Jenkins, George Jenkins, Nancy Sloan, Johnathan Sloan, Margaret Cowan, Andrew Cowin Rebecca White, Elizabeth Richardson, Benjamin Richardson, Jane Robinson, Alexander Robinson, Ester Sweazea, Joel Richardson, Harvey Richardson, Mary Ann Richardson, Caleb Richardson, Allen Richardson, Davidson Richardson, Martha Jane Richardson, John Richardson, Thomas Richardson agrees and covenants for ourselves our heirs and representatives to warrent and defend the title of the two parcels so conveyed to the said John & Stephen Jenkins against all claims by ourselves or persons under us in testimony whereof we have thereunto set our hands & seal this 15th day of January 1849 in the presence of;
Test. Johnathan Sloan seal
John A. Dycus Nancy Sloan seal
G. W. Veatch Joel Richardson seal
M.G.B. Stubblefield Test. Margaret Cowin seal
L. H. McCarver Andrew Cowin seal
P. J. Rawley Benjamin Richardson seal
Margaret Richardson seal
Caleb C. Richardson seal
State of Tennessee Jessee Jenkins seal
Jackson County Rebecca White seal
George Jenkins seal
Personally appeared before me Ester Sweazea seal
Sampson H. Cassetty Clerk of Jane Robinson seal
Jackson County Court John A. Alexander Robinson seal
Dycus M.G.B. Stubblefield Harvey Richardson seal
Subscribing witnesses to the Mathias Sweazea seal
within and foregoing deed who James A. Richardson seal
being first duly sworn depose
and say that they are personally acquainted with Johnathan Sloan,
Joel Richardson, Benjamin Richardson, Mary Ann Richardson, Caleb Richardson, Jessee Jenkins, Rebecca White, James A. Richardson, bargainors and that they acknowledged the same in their presence to be their acts and deed about the time it bears date with.

Also personally appeared before me Andrew Cowin, George Jenkins, Alexander Robinson bargainors to the within deed with whom I am personally acquainted and acknowledged the same to be their acts and deed for the purposes therein contained witness my hand at office this 5th day of march 1849.
S. W. Cassetty Clerk

State of Tennessee Personally appeared before me Sampson W. Cassetty
Jackson County Clerk of Jackson County Court, Elizabeth Richardson & Esther Sweazea for Court Bargainors to the within deed being examined privately and apart from their husbands acknowledged that they signed the same understandingly knowingly and without any ____? in _____?
restraint from their said husbands for the purposes therin contained witness my hand at office this 5th of March 1849.
S. W. Cassetty Clerk
Registered and examined on 7th day of July 1852 at 8 Oclock AM
John M. Gipson Registrar
State of Tennessee
Jackson County
I John M. Gipson registar of said County do hereby certify that the within contains a true full & perfect transcript or copy of a deed from Jessee Jenkins & others to John & Stephen Jenkins together with the several certificates thereto as appears on record in my office in Registers book H page 491 & 2 & 3. This 11th day of January 1856.

John M. Gipson Registrar

Copy of Deed From George Jenkins

to

John & Stephen Jenkins

Register fee $2.00
 
Jenkins, Esther (I0955)
 
133 [18212.ged]

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Land Records of George Sweezey of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

George Sweezey to Thomas Finley of Carlisle, 28 April 1775, 300 acres in
Cumberland Co., Pennsylvania, DB 1D:234.

THIS INDENTURE Made the Twenty eighth day of April in the Year of our Lord
one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy five, Between George Sweezey of RyeTownship in Cumberland County in the Province of Pennsylvania of the one
part. And Thomas Finley of the Town of Carlisle in the County and Province
aforesaid of the other part. Witnesseth that the said George Sweezey for and in Consideration of the Sum of One Hundred and Twenty four Pounds Lawful
Money of Pennsylvania to the said George Sweezey well and truly in Hand paid
by the said Thomas Finley at or before the Ensealing and delivery of these
Presents the Receipt whereof he the said George Sweezey doth hereby
acknowledge and thereof and of every part and parcel thereof doth Acquit
Exonerate, and discharge for ever the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns by these Presents, hath Granted, Bargained, Sold, Aliened, Released,
enscoffed and Confirmed, and by these Presents, doth Grant, Bargain, Sell,
Alien Release, Enscoff, and Confirm unto the said Thomas Finley his Heirs &
Assigns for ever all that Certain Piece or Parcel of Land Situate lying and Being in Wild cat Valley in Greenwood Township in the County aforesaid adjoining land of William Crocket on the East by Land of Peter Rush on the North and by Land of William Patterson Esquire and by Cockleamus hills, Containing three Hundred Acres of Land be the same more or less, together with all and Singular the Houses, Out-Houses, Edifices, and Buildings, thereon Errected, and Built, Profits, Commodities, Advantages, Emoluments, Hereditaments and Appurtenances, Whatsoever to the same Belonging, or in any wise appertaining, and the Reversion and Reversions, Remainder and Remainders Rents, Issues, and Profits thereof, and also all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest use, trust, property, Possession, Claim, and demand whatsoever of him the said George Sweezey of in or to the same or every or any part thereof, and also all deeds Evidences, and Writings, touching or Concerning the same or any part thereof And now in the Custody or Possession of him the said George Sweezey on which he can or may come by without Suit at Law or Equity. TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said Piece or Parcel of Land, Hereditaments and Premisses hereby granted with the Appurtenances unto the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns, to the only proper use, and Behoof of him the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns for ever. UNDER AND SUBJECT to the Purchase Money Interest and Yearly Quit-rent now due and hereafter to become due and Payable for the Same to the Chief Lord or Lords of the fee thereof And the said George Sweezey for himself and for his Heirs, Executors and Administrators, do Covenant, promise, and grant to and with the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns that he the said George Sweezey his Heirs and Assigns and all and every other Person and Persons his or their Heirs any thing having or Claiming in the said Premisses above granted, or meant Mentioned, or Intended so to be or any part thereof by from or under him them or any or either of them shall and will from time to time and at all Times hereafter Upon the Reasonable request and at the Proper Costs and Charges of them the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns make, do, and Execute or Cause and Procure to be made, done, and Executed, all and every such further and other Lawful and Reasonable, Act
and Acts, Thing and Things, Conveyances and Appertenances in the Law
whatsoever for the further better more sure and Perfect granting, conveying,
and Assuring of all and Singular the said Premisses with the Appurtenances
unto the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns for ever, as by him the said Thomas Finley his Heirs or Assigns or his or their Council learned in the Law shall be most reasonably advised, devised and Required. And the said George Sweezey for himself and for his Heirs the Said Piece or Parcel of Land above described and Premisses unto the said Thomas Finley his Heirs and Assigns against him the said George Sweezy and his Heirs, and against all and every other Person and Persons whatsoever Lawfully claiming said Premisses or any Part thereof, by, from or under him them or any of them shall and will Warrant and for ever defend by these Presents. IN WITNESS whereof the Said Parties in these Presents, have hereunto Interchangeably set their Hands and Seals, Dated the day and Year first above Written
Sealed and Delivered in the Presence of George Sweezey (seal)
the following words between lines 14 & 15
being first wrote VIZ Purchase money Interest
Peter Smith
John Creigh

Received on the day of the date of the above Indenture of the above Named
Thomas Finley the sum of one Hundred and twenty four pounds in full for the
Consideration Money above said Witnesses Present at Signing

John Creigh George Sweezey

Cumberland County. This 28th day of April Anno Domini one thousand Seven
Hundred and Seventy five. Before me the Subscriber one of his Majesties
Justices of the Peace for the County aforesaid Personally came the above
Named George Sweezey and Acknowledged the above Indenture to be his Act and Deed, and desired the same might be Recorded as Such. In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal the day and Year above Written
John Agnew (seal)
Recorded 29th April 1775
_______________________________________________________________
Thomas Finley of Carlisle to George Sweezey

Thomas Finley of Carlisle to George Sweezey, 200 acres on Mahentango Creek
in Penns Township, Cumberland Co., Pennsylvania, 28 April 1775, DB1D:236,

THIS INDENTURE made the Twenty eighth day of April in the Year of our Lord
one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy five Between Thomas Finley of the
Town of Carlisle in Cumberland County in the Province of Pennsylvania of the
one part And George Sweezey of Rye Township in the County and Province
aforesaid of the other part Witnesseth that the said Thomas Finley for and in Consideration of the Sum of one Hundred Pounds Lawful Money of Pennsylvania to him the said Thomas Finley well and truly in Hand paid by the said George Sweezy at or before the Ensealing & Delivery of these Presents the Receipt whereof he the said Thomas Finley doth hereby Acknowledge and thereof and of every Part and Parcel thereof doth Acquit Exonerate and discharge forever the said George Sweezey his Heirs & Assigns by these Presents, Hath Granted, Bargained, Sold, Aliened, Released Enscoffed, and Confirmed, and by these Presents, Doth Grant, Bargain, Sell, Alien, Release, Enscoff, and Confirm unto the said George Sweezey and to his Heirs and Assigns forever, all that Certain Piece or Parcel of Land Situate lying and being in the first fork of Mahentango Creek in Penns Township in the County aforesaid Containing two Hundred Acres, be the Same more of Less, which Tract was sold by Publick Vendue for its taxes as the Property of John Kingrigs, and was granted to a Certain William Alexander by William Miller and William Clark Commissioners for the County aforesaid by an Instrument of Writing bearing date the Twenty eighth day of February which was in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy one, which tract of Land was Granted and Conveyed unto a Certain William Cochran by the Twelfth day of March, which was in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy one, which tract was Granted & Conveyed unto the said Thomas Finley by the said William Cochran by a Certain Indenture bearing date the third day of April, which was in the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy three. Together with all and Singular the Houses, Out-Houses, Edifices and Buildings thereon Errected and Built, Profits, Commodities, Advantages, Emoluments, Hereditaments, and Appurtenances, whatsoever to the same belonging or in any wise Appertaining and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder and Remainders, Rents, Issues, and Profits thereof, and also all the Estate, Right, Title, Interest, use, Trust, Property Claim, and Demand whatsoever of him the said Thomas Finley of in the same or every or any part thereof, and also all deeds, Evidences, and Writings touching or Concerning the same or any part thereof, and now in the Custody or Possession of him the said Thomas Finley or which he Can or may come by without Suit(?) at Law or Equity: TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said Piece or Parcel of Land Hereditaments and Premisses, hereby granted with the Appurtenances unto the said George Sweezey his Heirs and Assigns to the only Proper Use, Benefit, and Behoof of him the said George Sweezey his Heirs & Assigns forever. UNDER and Subject to the Purchase Money Interest and Yearly Quit-Rent now due and hereafter to become due and Payable for the same to the Chief Lord or Lords of the fee thereof. And the said Thomas Finley for himself and for his Heirs, Executors, and Administrators, do Covenant, Promise, and Grant, to and with the said George Sweezey his Heirs, and Assigns, that he the Said Thomas Finley his Heirs, and Assigns, and all and every other Person and Persons his or their Heirs everything having or claiming in the sd. premisses above granted or meant mentioned or Intended so to be or any part thereof by for and(?) or under him this day(?) any or (?) of them shall and will from time to time and at all times hereafter upon the Reasonable request and at the proper (?) and Charges of him the said George Sweezey his Heirs and Assigns, make Do, and Execute, or Cause and Procure, to be made, done, and Executed all and Every such further, and other Lawful and Reasonable Act and Acts, thing and things Conveyances and Assurances in the Law whatsoever for the further Better more sure and Perfect, granting, conveying, and Assuring of all and Singular the said Premisses with the Appurtenances unto the said George Sweezey his Heirs and Assigns forever, as by him the said George Sweezey his Heirs or Assigns or his or their Council learned in the Law shall be most reasonably advised, devised, and Required. And the said Thomas Finley and his Heirs the said Piece or Parcel of Land above described and Premisses unto the said George Sweezey his Heirs and Assigns against him the said Thomas Finley and his Heirs and against all and every other Person & Persons Whatsoever Lawfully claiming said Premisses or any Part thereof, by from or under him them or any of them shall and will Warrant and forever defend by these Presents. IN WITNESS whereof the said Parties to these Presents have hereunto Interchangeably set their Hands and Seals, Dated the day and Year first above Written.

Sealed and Delivered
in the Presence of Thomas Finley (seal)
Between line 14 or 15 from the first
Read Purchase Money Interest and,
Peter Smith
John Creigh

Received on the day of the date of the above Indenture of the above Named George Sweezey the sum of one Hundred Pounds in full for the Consideration
Money above said Witnesses present at Signing
John Creigh Thomas Finley

Cumberland County. This 28th day of April Anno Domini one thousand Seven
Hundred and Seventy five, before me the Subscriber one of his Majesties
Justices of the Peace for the County aforesaid, Personally came the above
Named Thomas Finley and Acknowledged the above Indenture to be his Act and
Deed and Desired that the same might be Recorded as Such. In Witness
whereof I Have hereunto set my Hand and Seal the day and Year above Written
John Agnew (seal)
Recorded 1st May 1775
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pensylvania Archives, First State Tax, 1778, Cumberland County, Greenwood Township.
George Swezey Acres 97 .... horses..1 cattle... 1... Tax 2.10.0

Supply Rates for 1780; George Sweezy ... Acres 0... Horses.. 1 Cattle.. 1..

Transcript of Taxables; 1781.. George Swezey; 100 Acres.. Horses 1 Cattle.. 1

Transcript of Taxables; 1782.. George Sweezey.. 100 Acres.. 1 .. Horses.. 1 Cattle
Transcript of Taxables;.. 1785.. George Sweezy... 100 Acres.. 2.. horses.. 2.. Cattle
George Sweezy, was granted land in Rutherford County North Carolina, one year after his brother Mathias was killed. (1787) This land adjoined the land of Rachel on Sandy Run. Some thinks he came down to avenge his brothers death.

Rutherford Co., North Carolina, Land Grants: R 929,3756 D291 RE;91, No. 652,

N. C. Grant No. 204 Caswell to George Sweezy for 50 shill. every 100 a., tract of 100 a. on head of Sandy Run begin, at N. side Wagon Road in W. side of the creek. 9 Aug. 1787.

It is believed that George and Rachel were married after the death of Mathias and had children, Elijah, John, and Peggy Sweezy.
When George died his land was given to Hannah Web, daughter of Mathias and Rachel, her being the neighst in blood.

Muster rolls of Militia, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.
Captain John Hamilton's Company.
Company of Cumberland County Militia, Commanded by Colonel Arthur Buchannan in the Service of the United States for Two Months and Two Days, Commencing 20th January and Ending 30th March, 1778.
Corporal George Sweese
Private Daniel Sweese
No one knows what happened to George Sweesy. He left home one day to go and work in the field and never returned home. (This was in North Carolina) 
Sweesy, George (I1578)
 
134 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Larkin Sweazea was married Aug 3, 1837 according to Hannah Bible Records.

Larkin Sweazea was a farmer in Jackson County all of his life and died there between 1870 and 1880.

County Court Records from Jackson County, Tennessee 1855 to 1857

Logan H. McCarver admr of Samuel Hannah, deceased, and Logan H. McCarver and his wife Elizabeth vs. Larken D. Sweazea et al. Larkin Sweazea et al were his wife Lucinda, William and John Hannah, Juliet Hannah and James Drennon, Executor of Samuel M. Hannah, Juliet Hannah, George W. Sutton and wife Mary Agness formerly M.A. Hannah, Virginia T. and Francis Hannah the two latter are minors..their mother Juliet Hannah is appointed their guardian..non-resident defendants are Edward Dycus, L. Sloan and Calvin John and William James Wilson and Mary Dycus of Missouri .. subpoenas have been served on Pinckney McCarver, James Young, George Darwin, Daniel Huffines, Willis Cornwell and Dr. A. Furgason ..

Logan H. McCarver Admr of Samuel Hannah, deceased and Logan H. McCarver & wife Elizabeth vs Larken D. Sweazea et al. All the defendants with the exception of William Young, Larken Drury and Henry Cornwell, Thomas Hufhines & wife Harriet, Benjamin Payne, Sampson McClellan and Joseph Law .. .. right of complainant to recover as part of the estate the moeny paid to the children of Elizabeth Cornwell .. . Samuel Hannah departed this life in 1840 in Jackson Co .. his will had no subscribing witnesses. James Young and Samuel W. Hannah qualified as executors .. the following parties are his heirs at law: Melinda Dycus who married Edward Dycus. Lucinda Sweazea who married Larken D. Sweazea, Malina M. McCarver who married Logan H. McCarver. Sameul W. Hannah and two grandsons, John and William Hannah, sons of John Hannah. The widow, Elizabeth, having departed this life previous to the death of said Samuel Hannah. Jury found against said will and it was set aside. A very, very complicated document. Several slaves parceled out to heirs, tracts of land sold, Edward Dycus and his wife were in Missouri.

P155 Larkin D. Sweazea & wife vs Logan H. McCarver and others.

P195 Logan H. McCarver, Admr vs Larkin D. Sweazea and others, vice versa and Juliet Hannah and others vs Logan H. McCarver and others.

P235 Logan McCarver Admr vs Lucinda Sweazy et al. Defendants were Drury Cornwell, Larkin Cornwell, Joseph Shaw? Sampson McClellan, Thomas Huffhines and wife Harriet, Benjamin Payne, Alfred Cornwell and William Young from James Young ?? and Samuel W. Hannah deceased .. funds paid to them in 1841 and 1842 .."said defts children of Elizabeth Hannah not being devisees under the will of said Samuel Hannah deceased and the legacy of said Elizabeth being in the opinion of the Court a lapsed legacy the testators Samuel Hannah surviving the devisee Elizabeth Hannah deceased yet the Court is of opinion .."
 
Sweazea, Larkin (I0928)
 
135 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Letha Montgomery was the Great Great Grand Daughter of James Montgomery and Alcey Smith. They were married in Wayne County, Missouri March 3, 1814.
She was the great granddaughter of Robert Emmett Montgomery who was in the civil war in Missouri. He served in the 47th MO Inf. He died from exposure in the war at Jefferson Barracks, St Louis Missouri in 1864 at the close of the war. He was in the battle at Patterson, Mo. and when they left to march to Pilot Knob, Mo, Robert went to his home which was nearby. He was AWOL for a month and then he returned to his Unit at Pulaski, Tenn. He was charged with Desertion and Court marshalled. He was later pardoned. He never got to see his family again. He is buried at Benton Barracks National Cemetery. He is buried in a beautiful place and his Stone reads R E Montgomery 47th MO. 
Montgomery, Letha Delana (I0947)
 
136 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Lewis S. Moss is buried at Wadsworth, KS 
Moss, Lewis S. (I1285)
 
137 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Lloyd Sweezy lived at Oak Grove, near Moss, Tennessee. He was a Farmer, Logger and heavy equipment operator. 
Sweezy, Lloyd (I2231)
 
138 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Louisa was called Winnie in the 1850 census of Jackson County, Tennessee 
Sweazea, Louisa (I1057)
 
139 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Luther climbed up in a cherry tree, when he was six years old, and ate too many cherries with the seeds.
The seeds swelled and killed him right away. His brother Ira was five years old and not big enough to climb the tree or he would probably of done the same thing. this was in 1911. The family lived near Malden Missouri at the time. Luther is buried in the Malden Cemetary, near where his grandfather, George is buried. 
Sweezea, Luther Clarence (I0986)
 
140 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Marriage record of Richard Matthias Sweazea and Elender E. Lenard

Know all Men, by these Presents, That we, Matthias Swessey and _______S. H. Vinson _______ are held and firmly bound unto the State of Tennessee, in the sum of twelve hundred and fifty dollars, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, to be void on condition that there be no lawful cause why the above bound__________ Matthias Swessey_______and ________E. E. Lenard_______ should not be joined together as husband and wife in holy wedlock, else remain in full force and virtue.
This____7th _____day of ___March___1874
Matthias Swessey [seal]
S. H. Vinson [seal]

State of Tennessee Clay County.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To any regular ordained Minister of the Gospel, having the care of souls, or any acting Justice of the Peace for said County, or Judge or Chancellor of said State: Bond and security having been given in the premises, you are hereby authorized to solemnize the rites of matrimony between_________
Richard M. Swessey_________________and _________E. E. Lenard , and join them together in holy wedlock as husband and wife.

Given under my hand at office in Celina, this________7th____day of___March______1874

J. J. Brown_____Clerk
By virtue of the above license; I have this day solemnized the rites of matrimony between the above named parties.
Given under my hand, this the _______7th________day of______March_________-1874

R. Pedigo
 
Sweazea, Richard Mathias (I1172)
 
141 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Mathias Sweazea and Anna Dycus were married in Rutherford County, North Carolina about 1804. 
Family F350
 
142 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Mathias Sweazea was about 12 years old when his father, Mathias Sweesy was killed in Rutherford County, North Carolina in 1786. His mother had already died and he, along with his brothers, were taken to Wilkes County, (now Elbert County) Georgia to live with his grandfather, Richard Coulter. About 1800 he came back to Rutherford County and married, Anna Dycus??, about 1803. Their first son, Charles was born in Rutherford County, abt. 1805. Their other children were born in Tennessee. In 1804 Mathias (Matthew) Sweazea purchased 100 acres of land on Sandy Run Creek in Rutherford County, from Edward Dycus. This was adjoining land on which at that time Rachel Sweezy, the former wife of Mathias Sweesy was living.
They then moved west to Jackson County, Tennessee along with several other families from Rutherford. The " Sweazea" spelling began with this generation. Mathias Sweazea moved to Jackson County, Tennessee before 1812. He is listed on the tax roll for 1812 in Jackson County. Mathias Sweazea had three brothers, John, Richard, and Charles. Richard and Charles lived in Roane County, Tennessee after they left Georgia. They moved to Wayne County, Missouri about 1818.
Land Record;
Dycus, Edward / Sweazea, Mathew / Deed /22-23/97/ 1804 from North Carolina Archives.

Tennessee State Archives
Mathias Sweazea was granted land in Tennessee
Mountain District Land Grants
Grantee; Grant No. Acres Date County Book Page
Sweazea, Mathias 3367 50 May 13, 1834 Jackson A 495
The State of Tennessee No. 3367;
To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting; Know ye that by Virtue of entry to 692 made in the office of the entry taker of Jackson County and dated the 5th of January 1826. There is granted by the said State of Tennessee unto Mathias Sweazea a certain tract or parcel of land containing fifty acres by survey bearing date the 14th of December 1832. Lying in said County North of Cumberland River on the south side of Jennings Creek. Beginning at an Elm and Beech on the south boundary of his 100 acres running thence south eighty six and two tenth poles to a white oak on top of a high ridge, thence east one hundred and four poles to two beeches on top of a high ridge, thence north sixty six and two tenth poles to a stake on the south boundary of one of his 5 acre tracts, thence west with said line and with the south boundary of another of his 5 acre tracts, in all Forty eight poles to the south west corner of said five acres, thence north with the west boundary of said five acres twenty poles to the north west corner, thence west with the south boundary of said 100 acres fifty six poles to the beginning .
With the hereditaments and appurtenances to have and to hold said tract or parcel of land with it's appurtenances to the said Mathias Sweazea and his heirs forever. In witness whereof Wm Carroll, Governor of the State of Tennessee hath here unto set his hand and caused the Great seal of the State to be affixed at Nashville on the 13th day of May AD 1834.
And of the independence of the United States the 57th.
By the Governor, Wm. Carroll
Sam G. Smith, Secty. of State

Jackson County, Tennessee Court records Gainsboro, Tennessee
July Court, 1854, Page 163.
William C. A. Griffith and others vs William J. Dixon & Ensley Willmore.
Take Depositions of; Alexander Clark, Alexander Nevil, Soloman Wilson, Jefferdon Wilson, Ephraim S. Wilson Thomas N. Wilson, Larkin D. Sweazea, Mathias Sweazea Sr, Mathias Sweazea, Jr, Thomas N Wilson, Edward R Hancock, Jonas Sweazea, Henry Lovelady, Henry Sweazea, Jefferson Price, John Sisco, Thomas Schrum, Pleasant Hendley, Joseph Roddy, John McDonald, Pharis Sweazea, Thadias C Quarles, Alexander Keith, Valentine Van Hooser, Thompson Cason, David Meyers, Burril R Land, Jonathan Wilson Reubin Price, Leroy Gordon, Ben C White, Denton Moore, James Moss, Robert Moss, John Moss, Jonas Myers, Nathaniel M. Cox, Claiburn D. Witcher, Booker Witcher, Samuel T. Griffith, William P. Witcher & Polly ? Witcher.

At this time we don't know what this court case was about. It must have of been a big one.
Another Court Case;
John M. Clark vs P. F. Huddleston Admr etc. Take depos of Mathew Sweaza, Samuel Miller, Asa Lovelady, Henry Lovelady, Daniel Keith, Edwin Price, Russel K. Sweaza.. 
Sweazea, Mathias (I0956)
 
143 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Mathias Sweazea was born in Jackson County, TN. He was a farmer and had land grants in Jackson County. About 1840 he married Esther Jenkins and they had five sons. Esther died before 1870 and Matt married Lucy Graves. He sold his farm in Jackson County in 1874 and was living in Wilson County at the time. He lived near Lebanon, but we haven't been able to find him there. We don't know where or when he died. The 1880 census of Wilson County is not easy to read. Some of it is completely gone.

Book X Page 338: TENNESSEE LAND GRANT

The State of Tennessee No. 11313
To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting: Know ye that for and in consideration of the sum of One Cent per acre paid unto the office of the Entry Taker of Jackson County and entered on the 8th day of January 1827 pursuant to the provisions of an act of the General Assembly of said State passed on the 22 day of November 1825 by No. 1063.
There is granted by the State of Tennessee unto Mathew Swezea assignees of James G. Cunningham who was assignee of Johnson Hutchinson who was assignee of John H. Hutchinson a certain tract or parcel of land containing Twenty Five acres by survey bearing date the 6th day of October 1837. Lying in said County of Jackson on the north side of Cumberland River and on the south fork of Jennings Creek. Beginning at a stake on the south boundary line of a tract of land sold by John Chisum to Sully (Sally) Stacyrun???Thence south eight poles to a stake. Thence east ten poles to a stake. Thence south Forty one poles to a stake. Thence east eighty poles to a stake. Thence north Forty nine poles to a stake. Thence west ninety poles to the beginning. With the hereditaments and appurtenances to have and to hold the said tract or parcel of land with it's appurtenances to the said Mathew Swezea and his heirs forever.
In witness where of Andrew Johnson Governor of the State of Tennessee hath here unto set his hand and caused the Great Seal of the State to be affixed at Nashville on the fourth day of May in the year of our Lord 1854. And of the Independence of the United States the 77th year.
By the Governor
Andrew Johnson
Wm. B.A. Ramsey, Secretary

Court Record of Jackson County, Tennessee
P257 Friday 13 July 1855
John M. Clark vs P.F. Huddleston Admr etc. Take depose of Mathew Sweaza, Samuel Miller, Asa Lovelady, Henry Loveland, Daniel Keith, Edwin Price, Russell K. Sweaza..

Mathias Sweazea sells land to J. Cunningham
Know all men by these presence that I, Mattias Swezea, Jr., of this County of Jackson, State of Tennessee, am held and firmly bound unto J.G. Cunningham, of the County and State aforesaid in the penal sum of $620.00. To be void on the following conditions: Whereas I have this day sold unto J.G. Cunningham 7 3/4 acres of land in the field formerly owned by John M. Clark and of whom I bought the same in said County, State on the North fork of Jennings Creek. My deed from Clark is in the registrars office. I promise and want to copy the same to J. G. Cunningham when I get it out then this obligation to be void. Otherwise to remain in full force and effect. Given under my hand and seal this 2nd day of February 1857.
P.D. Cunningham Mathias Sweezea Seal
H. R. G. Sweezea

Mathias Sweazea sells land to Nathan Walker in Jackson Co., Tennessee
For the consideration of $310.00 to me paid the receipt I acknowledge I have this day bargained, sold & confirmed unto Nathan J. Walker a certain tract or parcel of land in the said County and State and in the 4th District & on Jennings Creek containing 7 1/2 acres.
This 9th day of June, 1857
Mathias Sweezea Seal

Mathias Sweazea sells his land on Jennings Creek and moves to Wilson County, Tennessee.
We Mathias Sweezy and Lucy Sweezy of the County of Wilson & State of Tennessee, for the sum of $2500.00 to us in hand paid the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged. Transfer, bargain, sell and convey unto J.S. Tinsley all our right title claim & interest in to a certain tract of land lying in Dist #4 of Jackson County, Tennessee. We the said, Mathias & Lucy Sweezy do covenant with the said J.S. Tinsley that said land is unincumbered we bind ourselves to forever warrant and defend the title to the same against all lawful claims. Given under our hands & seal the 7th day of February, 1874
Mathias Sweezea
Lucy X Sweezea
her mark 
Sweazea, Mathias (I0954)
 
144 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Mathias Sweesy was probably born in Hunterdon County, N.J. between 1750 and 1755. He moved with his family to Greenwood Twp, Cumberland County, PA. about 1768, when a young man. He married the daughter of Richard Coulter and moved to Rye Twp. PA about 1770. When the Revolutionary war started in 1776 he served in several campaigns as a first class soldier in the Cumberland Co., Militia. (see Pennsylvania Archives sixth series) After the war, he moved with his father in law, Richard Coulter, and all their families to the south. It seems that Mathias's wife died on the way down and Mathias stopped in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Richard Coulter and his sons and their families moved on to Wilkes County, Georgia (Now Elbert County). In 1785 Mathias married Rachel Burnett, widow of Joseph Burnett. They had a daughter , Hannah b. 1785. In 1786 Mathias was killed by John Baylis Earl. Some think it was a duel. (See Rutherford County court records, [ 1786 ]. John Earl and John Gasperson were charged with murder. Richard Coulter came up from Georgia and made an agreement with Rachel and took his grand children back to Wilkes County, (Now Elbert County) Georgia to raise them. Mathias still owned land in Pennsylvania. The land in N.C. was given to Rachel. The children kept the land in Pennsylvania. The Coulters moved to Blount County, Tennessee by the early 1800s.
_________________________________________________________________
The following was taken from the
Pennsylvania Archives Sixth Series;

First State Tax in 1778 - Rye Township, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania;

Mathias Swezey............42 Acres Tax 2.8.0
Richard Coulter.............59 Acres 2 horses 2 cattle Tax 8.11.0

Supply Rates in 1779 - Rye Twp. Cumberland County,

Matthias Sweezey.........50 Acres 1 horse 1 cattle
Richard Coulter............100 Acres 2 horses 2 cattle

Supply Rates in 1780 Rye Twp. Cumberland County,

Matthias Sweezey.........20 Acres 2 horses 2 cattle
Richard Coulter..............282 Acres 2 horses 6 cattle

Transcript of Taxables in 1781 Rye Twp. Cumberland County
,
Mathias Sweezy............30 Acres 3 horses 2 cattle
Richard Coulter...........282 acres 2 horses 7 cattle

Transcript of Taxables in 1782 Rye Twp. Cumberland County,

Mathias Sweezy...........30 acres 2 horses 4 cattle
Richard Coulter.............280 Acres 2 horses 8 cattle

In 1783 The Coulters, Sweezys, Stephens, and other Families left Pennsylvania and moved south to Wilkes County, Georgia. Except that Mathias stopped in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Evidently his wife had died on the way down.
Richard Coulter had three sons and a son-in-law. Mathias Sweezy was the son in law. ________________________________________________________________
In 1785 Rutherford County, North Carolina Court Records, Mathias Swasey Administrator, returned an inventory of the estate of Joseph Burnett, deceased, five pounds. Mathias had married Rachel the widow of Joseph Burnett. They had a daughter that same year, named Hannah. Hannah married Jermiah Webb.

John Baylis Earl and John Gasperson were charged with killing Mathias.

RUTHERFORD COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA
COURT RECORDS

Jurors of July Sessions A. D. 1786

David Moore Appeal on a warrant
= Judgment Confirmed for
Timothy Riggs the defendants ________

John Balias Earl a Minor pre
Gave James Miller James Withrow John Camonian & James Logan Esq. Securities in the sum of 250 pounds Each to be levied of their goods & chattels Lands & increments to be paid on condition that John Baylis Earl make his pursonall appearance at Morgan Superior on a charge of Homicide and not depart there without leave_________
Ordered by the court that letters of administration give to Rachel Sweesy on the goods and chattles - Rights - Credits of Mathias Sweesy, Deceased. The said administrator gave bond with David Huddleston & William Robertson Surety in the sum of 400 Hundred pound Surety______Adm. Sworn_____
Rachel Sweesy Prosecutor Bound in 500 pounds to appear at Morgon Superior Court.
Joseph Burnet & Robert Irving Bound in the sum of 100 pounds each as witnesses on behalf of the State against John B. Earl and John Gasperson.
John Gasperson principal bound in the sum of 500 pound Hugh Greenwood & Munford Wilson in the sum of 250 pounds each to be levied of their goods & chattles - lands increments to be paid on condition that the principal make his personal appearance at next Superior Court to be held for Morgan District on a charge of homicide & not depart there without leave be___________

_Note; John Gasperson was removed from the courtroom for using foul language. For the outcome of the trial, we haven't been able to read the records. ________________________________________________________________
So an Agreement was made by Richard Coulter and Rachel Burnett for Richard Coulter to take his grandchildren back to Georgia, and raise them there.

Rutherford County North Carolina
Records from October Court 1786

The Articles of agreement made between Rachel Sweesy and & Richard Coulter as followeth;
- - - - - - - - - - - Articles of Agreement made & agreed between Richard Coulter of State of Georgia & Rachel Sweesy of Rutherford County in North Carolina are as follows,
to Witt
---------------The said Richard Coulter for the Natural Love and affection he bears toward his daughter formerly the wife of Matthias Sweesy, deceased, on his part agrees to take all the children of his daughter, deceased, & their part of the Estate of their Father Matthias Sweesy, deceased, & bring up said children & be accountable to said children for that part of said estate he has taken into his possession as mentioned in a schedule here unto announced & further agrees to keep her the said Rachel Sweesy her heirs and indemnifiers from all persons and manner of persons under him or them claiming any right or title the said Two Hundred acres of land wheron she now lives or any part of it.
And the said Rachel Sweesy on her part agrees to quit all claims for her and her heirs to all the lands & tenements owned or claimed by her late husband Matthias Sweesy, deceased, lying and being in the state of Pennsylvania. and to keep him the said Coulter & his heirs and the aforesaid children & their heirs Indemnifiers from all persons under her claiming any right or title to said land or any part thereof or any part of the goods mentioned in the above said schedule in Witness Whereof the said Richard Coulter & Rachel Sweesy have herewith set their hands & seals this 14th day of Sept. 1786
Test:
Timothy Riggs, Esq. Richard Coulter [seal]

John Mackie_______ Rachel X Sweesy [seal]
her mark


-------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------
A Schedule of the goods taken by Richard Coulter

| L | | |
Note:
% one Rifle gun 6 The
% one set of plow irons 3 First
% an ass 5 Column
% Wagon gears 2 10 is
% one pot 5 marked
% Cooper tools 15 by
% Horse & Bridle 8 the
% Two teams & Harness 7 English
% Waggon 6 pound
% Saddle 2 10 sign.
% Bed furniture 1 10 The
% Pewter 10 second
% Boots 1 column
% one hat 10 must
% Boddy Clothes 4 be
% one Great Coat 1 10 shilling?
_____________________

Total amount 40 5 0
_________________________________________________________________

Mathias Sweesy was a First Class Soldier in the Revolutionary War from 1775 to 1783. Some of his records are as follows;

State of Pennsylvania;

County of Cumberland, Seventh Battalion, 1st Class, In Service July, 1777.
Captian James Fisher, ..........Private... Matthias Sweezy.

Captain David Marshall's Company. A class Roll of the Third Company of the Fifth Battalion of Cumberland County Militia, December, 1780.
First Class,........ Mathias Swezey.

An Account of the First, Second and Third Classes of the Fifth Battalion of Cumberland County Militia, Called upon to Perform a Tour of Duty by Two Orders of Council.
Third Company,........First Class...... Mathias Sweezy.

There are more records in the Pennsylvania Archives, 6th series. 
Sweesy, Mathias (I0902)
 
145 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Matt and John were Twins. 
Brasel, Matt (I2323)
 
146 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Modelia was a Wise County, Texas school teacher. 
Sweazea, Modelia (I1523)
 
147 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Nancy was listed as Nannie in the 1860 census of Wayne County, Missouri. 
Sweazea, Nancy (I1202)
 
148 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Nancy? Coulter was the daughter of Richard Coulter and Rebecca Walker of Rye Township, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania.
Richard Coulter was a Captain in the Continental Army from Cumberland County.
Pennsylvania. Richard and his sons, Francis, Richard Jr, Charles, and his son-in-law, Mathias Sweesy all served in the Revolutionary War,
according to the Pennsylvania Archives 6th Series. 
Coulter, Jane? (I0892)
 
149 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Orlan Sweazea was shot to death at Anadarka, Oklahoma in 1933. 
Sweazea, Orlan (I1707)
 
150 [18212.ged]

[sweeze~2.FTW]

Paul worked for The Hershey Company in Bellevue, Washington. He lived in Medina, Washington. 
Sweazea, Paul (I1127)
 

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