BeddowTree

The Genealogy of the Beddow Family (and others)

Charles Swezea

Male 1860 - 1927  (67 years)


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  • Name Charles Swezea  [1, 2, 3
    Born 6 Jul 1860  Walla Walla County, Washington Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Nov 1927  Walla Walla, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Person ID I0797  Merged Tree

    Father Thomas Jefferson Swezea,   b. 6 Dec 1809, Roane Co/Hickman Co. Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jan 1887, Walla Walla, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Mother Lucinda,   b. 4 Jan 1820, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1895, Walla Walla, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Married 4 Jun 1835  Wayne County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Family ID F291  Group Sheet

    Family Margaret Ann Davis,   b. 31 Aug 1864, Walla Walla County, Washington Territory Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 11 Feb 1883  Walla Walla, County Washington Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Children 
     1. Bessie Alma Swezea,   b. 20 Jan 1884
     2. Flinn Swezea,   b. 18 Jan 1886
     3. Grace Swezea,   b. 20 Jul 1887
     4. Margaret Swezea,   b. 23 Sep 1889
    Family ID F495  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • [18212.ged]

      [sweeze~2.FTW]

      D.A.R. Library Washington D.C. D.A.R. Yakima, Wa.
      NARCISSA PRENTISS CHAPTER; WALLA WALLA, WA.

      Thomas J. Swezea, Lucinda Swezea, and Charles L. Swezea

      Thomas Jefferson Swezea was born in Tennessee in 1809 and spent his early youth there. He later moved into South-eastern Missouri where he was married and lived until 1859. In 1859 he and his wife, Lucinda, (nee Sweazea, B. Jan. 4, 1820) began their journey Westward, six children with them. The trip was with a large wagon train and took five months, the family arriving in Walla Walla in September of 1859. Two girls were left in Missouri, one married, one deceased. The children coming were four boys and two girls, the older of which rode horseback a large part of the way. The family was prompted to leave because of the "war talk" of the time in a section of Missouri that was politically undecided.
      Unlike many emigrants of the time, Mr. Swezea brought a considerable amount of his property with him. He drove a large herd of cattle across the plains. He brought about $500 in gold pieces, four of these gold dollars are still in possession of various members of the Swezea family. Mr. Swezea was a plantation owner in Missouri and was, perhaps, the only slave holder who ever brought his human property into Walla Walla. Before leaving all the slaves were sold except one Negro mammy who had nursed Mrs. Swezea in childhood.Coming West she attended the family here for several years, finally marrying and moving to The Dalles, Oregon.
      Upon arriving in Walla Walla, Mr. Swezea purchased several lots between Second and First Streets on Main. Here he built a two room cabin. The rooms were connected by a shed roof. One section was heated by a cobblestone fireplace, and the other section contained the wooden bedsteads. The cabin stood here for many years and among the guests who shared its hospitality was the Methodist missionary Wilbur.
      It was in this cabin that Charles L. Swezea was born July 6, 1860. He was the first white boy born in the City of Walla Walla. The birth was celebrated by a serenade which most of the citizens of the then small city attended. Gen. McAuliffe (an early mayor of Walla Walla) favored the event with a fife solo. The celebration was symbolic that the people had found a place for their homes, and a suitable place to rear their families.
      Thomas J. Swezea later built a log house on the property now occupied by the First National Bank. But, herding his cattle in the outskirts of the town, he soon saw the need for additional land. He traded a yoke of oxen for 160 acres in the Cottonwood area. Later he secured an additional 110 acres in the Cottonwood district upon which property he made his home for many years. Here he planted an orchard and people came from as far as La Grande hauling the apples by the wagon load. Later he and his wife retired to the City of Walla Walla where he died Jan. 26, 1887. Lucinda Swezea died March 22, 1895.
      Charles L. Swezea lived upon this 100 acre farmstead until his death, Nov 11, 1927 His early schooling was in the log type school, and he spent two years, 1876 and 1877, at the Whitman Seminary.

      SIGNED: Bessie Alma Hargett
      R.F.D. #3 Walla Walla, Wn.
      April 6, 1940

  • Sources 
    1. [S01646] Sweazea.FTW.
      Date of Import: Jun 11, 1999

    2. [S01648] sweeze.
      Date of Import: Aug 1, 1999

    3. [S12068] 18212.ged.
      Date of Import: Jun 7, 2001


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